An Introduction to Dog Beds

March 28, 2008

Some people are so attached to their pets that they wouldn’t dream of asking them to simply curl up on the floor to go to sleep. Pet owners, especially dog owners, have created an industry for dog beds that rivals the bedding industry for humans in both creativity and profit margins.

Just as dogs come in a variety of sizes — from toy Chihuahuas that fit in the palm of your hand to Great Danes who are large enough to command most of the back of that family SUV — so do dog beds. The very first designs for dog beds stressed comfort and ease of cleaning for the small, medium, large and extra large pooch in your life. Today there is a dizzying array of options for dog beds. There are dog beds designed to look like real beds so the lucky canine doesn’t feel left out, dog beds designed to look like real furniture, and dog beds for that aging canine, designed to accommodate his creaking bones and stiff joints. There are dog beds made out of fabrics designed to blend in with the décor of your home and there are dog beds that can accommodate a dog who likes to stretch out while he naps versus the type who prefers to curl up into a ball.

No longer is it sufficient to simply walk into a pet store, find a comfortable looking bed for Rex, choose a color that matches your décor, (or his) and leave. Today you have to take many factors into consideration when making decisions about your dog’s sleeping quarters.

The first thing to think about is where in the house you intend to place the bed. Some people put the dog’s bed in the living room, so the dog has a place to lounge other than the family sofa. Other people put the dog bed in their bedroom, so the dog can be close without needing to jump into their bed. Some other things to consider are the size of your pet, and his sleeping habits.

There are also extras such as eucalyptus treatments and cedar filling (both to repel fleas), foam filling for the comfort of arthritic animals, and various Velcro attachments. Washing and cleaning are factors to take into account as well, both in terms of everyday wear and because of the dirt incurred from other uses for the bed such as a carrier liner or car seat protector. Gone are the days when buying a dog bed was simple and easy, but the tradeoff is a truly mind-boggling array of options.

About the Author

Dog Beds Info provides detailed information about small and large dog beds, as well as designer, orthopedic, and discount dog beds. Dog Beds Info is the sister site of Bird Cages Web.

Children and Dogs

March 28, 2008


presented by David the Dogman


As an ardent reader of the Collins Dog Photoguide I came across this article, which I feel, might be of interest to readers.

Traffic Accidents

A traffic accident is probably the most common cause of serious injury to a cat or dog. Always approach the animal with caution, it may react aggressively because of the pain.

Move the dog as little as possible, but if you must move it, it is probably best to use a blanket, sliding it underneath the dog. Seek the assistance of another person and lift the dog gently to safety. Check for heartbeat and any haemorrhaging. Attempt to stem excessive bleeding by holding a clean pad or clean handkerchief over the wound, binding it tightly with a makeshift bandage. Call the nearest vet’s surgery to warn of your arrival.

Burns

The only recommended first aid is to clean off the offending substance and immerse the body part under cold running water for as long as possible. Seek professional advice immediately.

Heat Stroke

This occurs most commonly when a dog has been left alone on a hot day without ventilation. If your dog has not already collapsed it may be panting, vomiting or frothing at the mouth.

Remove froth and lower the dog’s temperature as soon as possible by placing or dousing the animal in cold water. Take the dog to the vet immediately where it will be treated with drugs and more cold water.

Poisoning

Signs of poisoning may include collapse, muscular twitching, vomiting, bleeding or convulsion. Do not hesitate to contact the vet. Take some of the noxious substance to the vet with you if you know what it is. If the dog has recently swallowed the poison, try to make it vomit. Salt and mustard in water will usually work quickly, or a small piece of washing soda (sodium carbonate0 pushed down the throat.

Drowning

It is a popular misconception that all dogs can swim, but this is not always the case. You must attempt to empty the dog’s lungs of water as soon as possible. You must attempt to empty the dog’s lungs of water as soon as possible. Place the dog’s head lower than its body, open its mouth and begin to pump the chest by pressing down on the ribs and releasing the pressure immediately. Repeat at five-second intervals.

Choking

Sometimes a piece of stick, bone or small rubber ball may get stuck in a dog’s throat. Your dog may be unable to breath as a result and swift action is necessary.

Open the dog’s mouth carefully and see if you can see the object. Pumping the chest, as in the case of drowning (see above) may dislodge the foreign body, get your dog to the vet as soon as possible where the object can be removed under anaesthetic.

Commitment, Firmness, but kindness.

Brought to you by: World Wide Information Outlet – http://certificate.net/wwio/, your source of FREEWare Content online.

Do you have any problems with your pet? Then why not send your problem to DAVID THE DOGMAN.

David is a Canine Behaviourist who works and lives in Marbella, Spain. Tel/Fax (00345) 2883388.
His web site is located at: http://www.thedogman.net.

David has his own radio and TV shows, and writes for many newspapers and magazines. David has been working with dogs for many years and started his career in Israel, working on the Border Police. He has been involved in all forms of training, including air sea rescue, air scent work, and has trained dogs for finding drugs. David has devoted the past 10 years to studying behaviour and the very passive approach. He does not use choke chains, check chains, or any form of aggression.


David The Dogman is available for private consultations in your home, for further details telephone; Tel; (95) 2883388

A funny true life dog story

March 28, 2008

This is the story of my dog called Shandy. He was my favourite pet and he was very lively, lots of fun and very obedient. His main passion in life was to be taken for a long walk, culminating with a big run out in his favourite park.

I would try to take him on this walk everyday, weather permitting. The park itself was about three miles away from our house. To reach the park we had to cross a number of busy roads, however he would never pull or misbehave. He knew where we were heading and seemingly did not want to rock the boat and risk been taken home before he reached his dream destination.

At the park itself I would throw a ball and he would chase it and fetch it back to me.

At this stage I was living at home with my parents, however aged twenty two, I decided to rent my own bungalow near the coast in Devon. This was nearly two hundred miles away from my parents in home in Birmingham. This obviously meant I was no longer in the position to take Shandy on his walk.

I spoke to my parent, who reassured me that they would continue to take him on the walks.

Two weeks after I had left, I had a phone call from my mother. She was panicking, stating that Shandy had managed to escape from the back garden and that she could not find him. She insisted that she had bben looking for hours but that there had been no sign of him.

I was quite worried and thought about where he may have gone to. “Have you been taking him on his walks to the park everyday?” I asked. She replied: “Most days” I asked her to try at the park, telling her that he loves that park etc. “He would not be there, its miles away.” She said. I again asked her to try there. Luckily he was there quite happily sniffing around, unaware of the panic he had caused.

Stephen Hill

——————————————————————————–

About the Author

Stephen Hill has a couple of websites at http://www.lasik-laser-surgery.co.uk and at http://www.stutter-stuttering.com.

A Dog Name is Something To Be Chosen Carefully

March 28, 2008

How important is a dog name? Well let’s think about this.

How often do you call your dog? Who will hear your dog’s name? Will you be writing to anyone about this dog?

Now that you think about the times you’ll use the name, maybe you should put some thought into what that dog name is.

I mean, if you have a Great Dane who weighs 120 lbs, you might not want to call him something like Baby or Tiny. Or you might… it’s a personal thing. Personally, Tiny would be hilarious to me.

I can just imagine calling, “Tiny, come here boy!” While a neighbor is watching and for the first time sees this “Tiny.” Now that could be an interesting look to receive!

Maybe you have a dog that has a bit of a fiesty side nd you think it’s a good idea to call him “Killer.” Maybe you weren’t thinking about the little old lady that lives by herself next door… waiting for “Killer” to go home so she can get to the grocery store.

Are these extremes? Of course! But, haven’t you heard some dog names that just didn’t seem… right?

My dogs have some sort of silly names. Actually, my Black Lab, Sadie, had a carefully chosen name. I was pregnant with my first child when we got Sadie. She was six weeks old and clever as they come.

Sadie was very majestic in all her movements and attitudes. So, we decided to look at our baby name book and see what we could come up with to suit her.

Sadie is actually a pet form of Sarah, which means “lady” or “princess” in Hebrew.

It totally fit her and is the best suited dog name I think we could have given her.

Two of her sons, however, were not so fortunate. See, two years ago Sadie had a litter of 7 pups, which we did not intend to keep. We already had four dogs and didn’t need any more.

We cared for the pups though and watched them grow each day. My husband and I would swap stories about the cute little things they did.

The dogs all looked so much alike that we found it confusing to talk about them without names. Eventually, names started emerging on their own.

For example, there was one brown dog in the mix. (How he got this color and look is a mystery.) So we called him Brownie. Not the cleverest of names, but it helped us identify him.

Next there was Tipper and Bubba, who we ended up keeping. Tipper has a tiny patch of white on the tips of his front paws… hence the name “Tipper.”

Bubba, as his name might suggest, is a big brute. He’s the biggest and the meanest of the litter.

But, if we knew we were going to keep these guys, we might have gone a different route in choosing a dog name. Bubba doesn’t exactly say, “Son of a princess,” but his attitude definitely does.

So here are some examples of the different ways a dog name can make a difference.

My advice? Think about all the times you’ll use the name. Find out a little about who your dog is before giving him a name. And, think of yourself 10 years older than you are now… will you still like to say that name and think… I chose that?

About the Author

About the Author:

Tina Spriggs is an expert dog lover whose lifelong interest in canines provides the motivation for her site. To learn more about dogs or to find gifts and toys for them visit her site at Dog Gifts and Toys for Dog Lovers.

Copyright 2004. All rights reserved.

17 Tips That’ll Safeguard You and Your Family From Dog Bites

March 28, 2008

Did you know that more than one million
north americans will be bitten by dogs
this year, and about one million dog bites
will go unreported.

Its sad but most of the victims will be children.
These dog bites will come from animals known
to them. Unleashed dogs will account for most
of the bites inflicted.



What Makes Dogs Bite


Not being educated and pet owners not being
committed on training their pet is what leads
to most of these dog bites. We must realize
that dogs don’t normally become a part of our
families already trained.


Why Then Do Dogs Bite?


1.They will bite if scared, angry, or threatened.
Even a dog thats friendly will bite.


2.If he feels he’s cornered or crowded.


3.They will protect what they think belongs to them.
Like their food, toys.


4.Dogs will protect their space such as sleeping area,
yard, porch, cars and home.


5.Dogs are predatory by nature and love to chase
and attack.


6.A stray dog may feel upset being lost or hurt and
bite with alot less provocation.


7.A dog being startled may lash out and bite.


How to Prevent Bites


8.Teaching young children to be careful around pets.
Don’t allow children to play rough or allow pupies to
bite. Not even play biting.


9.Teach your children never get close to strange dogs.


10.Leave a dogs things alone like food, toys, bones,
ect.


11.Most injuries are caused by getting too close to a
dogs face with your own.


12.Refain from running past a dog. They love to chase.
Avoid getting a dog excited or aggressive, by yelling
and screaming.


13.You never want to pet a dog thats eating, sleeping
or careing for its puppies.


14.Stay away from dogs that are tied up or in cars.


15.You should always ask permission from a pet owner
to pet his dog. Even if he’s present and the dog’s on
a leash.


16.Refrain from swinging your arms or things you have
at a dog. It may think its an invitation to bite.


17.You should never pet stray dogs or ones running loose.


Its great to have a dog go on a hike or walk on a trail
with you but we humans need to treat dogs with respect.
Just remember to teach your children how act around dogs,
it will keep them safe.

About the Author

Val and Robin Shortt are experienced campers and own three outdoor websites For more tips like these and to register for their Free newsletter visit:Good Night Camping Equipment

12 Golden rules for every Dog owner

March 28, 2008

Discipline and good behavior are not just for your Dog they apply to you, the pet-parent too. Buying a dog is not all

“cochie coo” business — it signals the beginning of a lifetime of commitment and responsibility.

1.Love your dog unquestioningly. Treat him like a friend. Never hurt, punish, beat or abandon him. Seek professional

help if you are ever pushed against the wall – there are feasible solutions to everything.
2.Ensure good nutrition.
3.Take an informed decision about spaying/neutering.
4.Give him good veterinary care. Half yearly check ups, vaccinations, dental check ups, and more.
5.Ensure that all his papers are in order – get him an ID and license.
6.Training is a key to a long and fulfilled life.
7.Groom him everyday or as many times as necessary. Grooming is one way of bonding with your dog.
8.Socialize your dog from day one – this will help him be comfortable around other people and animals as well as in

public places.
9.Devote at least 30 minutes everyday to play with your dog.
10.Ensure that you are a lawful dog owner– obey all leash, vaccination, and noise pollution laws.
11.Always clean up after your dog – it prevents infections.
12.Exercise your dog for at least 30 minutes each day.

These golden rules will help you grant the boon of a good life to your dog and believe me a dog that leads a well balanced

life hardly ever develops any behavioral problems.

Whether you are a first time dog owner or a seasoned veteran, your learning never stops as far as it comes to training your

dog. Each and every dog presents different training challenges, and the more equipped you are to handle these training issues

the more likely you are to prevent any permanent and long term future behavioral problems.

If you are serious about your dog, and want the very best for her/him, then you owe it to your best friend to get a copy of

this FREE Dog Training Mini-Course. You can still get it from here:

http://www.dogtrainingmastery.com/Free_Dog_Training/dog-obedience-training.htm

About the Author

Ray Coleiro is the author of the popular book “Dog Training Mastery – An Owner’s Manual!” To learn more about his proven Dog Training methods and life’s work, you can visit

http://www.dogtrainingmastery.com/Dog_Training/dog-training.htm

Note: The author grants permission to you to re-print, pulish or broadcast this article so long as it is un-altered or not edited in any way, and that all links remain present and active.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.